my libyan affair

Tuesday, May 30, 2006

fury of mother nature


When there is a difference in temperature over large cross section area of land, and in the attempt to bring balance to the equation, come mother nature's most vicious fury, the sandstorm.

i am sandstormed that day, in fact, three straight relentless day battered and hammered by practically flying sand and high velocity wind.

what to do then, stay indoors lah and see Harmid face, Harmid see my face. muehehe. no tv, satelite dish flown away.

Photo of awan

It was tension but calm that day. Tension in a sense that we are gearing up 120% to complete our preparation for the launching day tomorrow. Calm comes in the form of the nice cloud formation in this picture. I have never seen such cloud, like the whitish pattern in your coffee when you stir your Nescafe with extra Coffeemate. Anyhow, the weather is cooling calm, the clouds are calm, I am calm, but my team are not. He he he.


Subhanallah the cloud are so beautiful, they are simply breathtaking. I hope the photo will give u the same impact I felt when I saw those. But I also have some feeling that my team aren’t sharing the same emotions with meg because they are die die trying to finish up what we have planned for tomorrow event. Come, lets enjoy another picture while our boys are working behind me. He he he. Hope they don’t mind.




Seem like white smoke from sabut nyioq kena bakaq eh?. And if you can see, the time stamped on the photo are Malaysian local time (forgot to change mah), which means, the time this photo was taken is about 6:27pm Libya time.

Ok, after the hu-ha and oohs and aahs, my team finally manage to complete the preparation for the launching day tomorrow.

Everything gone well for the launching. Many photos were taken and many outside people turned up for the event.

After the calm sensation yesterday, and after all the commotion of the launching day have gone, when all who have come dispersed everywhere to I don’t know where, come the fiercest weather I have ever seen. The sandstorm.

Well, actually I don’t know if this is the REAL desert sandstorm in the real desert deep south, but trust me, the sandstorm I had that day is quite how to say, “dahsyat”.

Our first day

Harmid said I should take this shot when the sun is nicely brighten up the minaret, emitting the yellowish glow from behind the tower, illuminating the bulan sabit and the mosque as whole.

I like this photo, though I feel that the horizontal alignment aren’t plane and the focus of the camera is not very well.

That day, was our very first day staying in Um al Gandil, the two of us, foreigners from distance land, staying in a land far away from any necessities readily available in our place back home. What we have there, apparently is the mosque, a benzene station, small clinic, some workshop and of course two groceries store.

And on that very first day, we decided to walk to the groceries shop in front that very late evening, misjudging the distance and just relying on the phrase, “dekat aje..” but on that day Harmid and I learned our first lesson living in the desert. Things you can see out here doesn’t necessarily means its “dekat aje”. Sometimes it can be “very jauh”. And the “dekat aje” walk we took to Abdul Gader shop cost us about half and hour or approximately 2.4km or almost 5km to and fro our house. Quite a distance to cover by walking.

And the sun sets very quickly, leaving the 2 poor Malaysians (nganga) again pondering on their decision to walk to the shop that evening, because darkness falls almost immediately after the sun sets. “Have to buy torch light lah wan,” . So the two strangers set foot again struggling to find their way home in the dark.

After all the struggle, just to prepare a dinner for the night, proved to be rather useless. Because we forgot to buy salt. Ceh.

Almost Got Unta as my ride

Betcha u dont see this everyday if youre in Malaysia.


Then suddenly on May 25, 2006 a trailer laden with camels stopped in front of our workshop while we are busy clearing and unloading the newly arrived container. They brought down one half-life camel, probably exhausted due to the heat and the long journey. Amazingly, none of the other ‘passenger’ on board want to disembark there.


The lorry driver gave the poor fellow some water, after a while the camel awake. The locals hurried to the scene to see what is happening. The driver just left the camel there and said, if this camel died, just shove him to the side and bury him there, if he is alive, take it. I was told that, this full grown camel costs about LD700.00 if its up for sale. That, my friend, translate to RM2,100.00 back home. can buy one PSP liao.

And I said to Harmid, why didn’t u take the camel, its in front of our workshop, we keep him inside the workshop, feed him and bela like our camel, then we can go to site by camel mah. Harmid said, cannot lah, those villagers already booked the camel.

Imagine I’m going to my jobsite riding a camel.

Ya Marhaba, marhaba…kois mudir, kois..

Kois indeed. Hehehe..


Monday, May 29, 2006

lets get started

hi,

hmm..

apparently, i dont know how to give start to this introduction, but somehow, i wanted to start a blog of my own. Journal writings or whatever, well, have never really worked on me. I never seem to have the discipline, dedication or the talent to start a writing that will interest many, let alone for everyone else to see.

so right now, what im trying to initiate here is, a photo blog. A collection of photos i have taken during my stay in the great people jamahiriyan state of libya.

Enjoy.

SAFWAN FAKHRIN MOHD.